Maui Children Activity Guide

Receive a copy of our Maui Activity Guide for families with children for $5.95. It is loaded with fun and safe Maui Activities written by a Local on Maui, including an insider’s perspective on everything Maui. Here is an excerpt on West Maui beaches:

 

West Maui Beaches:

  • Slaughterhouse / Mokuleia – West Maui

Excellent snorkeling on the right. Long flight of stairs leads to sandy beach. No facilities, no lifeguards. Can swim into Honolua Bay. Limited parking. Best of kids 10 and up. Not good for snorkeling in the winter.

  • DT Fleming – West Maui

This beach park has shade, BBQs, and restrooms.  Great spot to relax and watch great surfing. Has lifeguards and plenty of parking

  • Kapalua Bay – West Maui

Rated one of the best beaches on the planet. Beautiful bay and sandy beach. Good beginner snorkeling. Water is usually gentle. Restrooms, walking paths, showers, palm trees. Parking is fine early. No lifeguards.

  • Napili Bay – West Maui

Snorkeling is good here. Turtles frequent the area. Sandy beach is fun for kids. Good surf in winter, restaurant down the beach. Restrooms and showers, but no lifeguards. It’s best to park early.

  • Airport / Kahekili Beach – West Maui

This is a beach park. Great beach for kids, no lifeguards, lots of turtles, restrooms and easy parking, BBQs, and showers. The reef here goes a long way, so there’s plenty to explore.

  • Ka’anapali / Black Rock – West Maui

  • This is one of the most popular Maui beaches. It also boasts the famous Black Rock jumping-off point (Pu’u Keka’a). It’s a long sandy beach with good snorkeling. Expect to park at Whaler’s Village and get validated.

BE SAFE & BE AWARE! There have been several injuries in this area. Especially visitors getting in trouble in the water by Black Rock.

  • Canoe / Hanakao’o Beach – West Maui

Nice beach for hanging out and swimming. Turtles often seen from shore. Has lifeguards and great facilities – even BBQs and picnic tables! Parking is super easy.

  • Baby Beach – West Maui

This is one of the best Maui beaches for kids of all ages. No lifeguards, no facilities. Very shallow, with calm water. Good place to wade or learn how to swim. Think of a huge, sparsely populated tide pool. Bring an umbrella – there is zero shade.

  • Puamana Beach Park – West Maui

Great family hangout beach! Walking paths, restrooms, showers, BBQs, picnic tables, lawn to play on, lots of shade. No lifeguards. Parking is easy.

  • Launiupoko Beach Park – West Maui

Great kids beach. Ocean wading pool, picnic tables, BBQs. Sand, lawn, restrooms, showers. Good for learning how to SUP or surf.

  • Olowalu – West Maui

Miles of coral reef in shallow water. Beach isn’t uber-comfortable, but the water’s awesome. No facilities but trash bins, no lifeguards. Parking is easy. Leave before dark for highway safety. Good snorkeling but shark breeding area in the winter so be careful.

10 Top Tips to Empower Your Kids By Jayneen Sanders, Contributor

The most empowering thing you can do for your child is to trust them, show and model respect towards them, and encourage them in all they choose to do!

As parents, we want our kids to grow up confident, with an amazing sense of self-worth, a whole lot of resilience and respect for others, and the world around them. As adults, we know persistence and tenacity are important traits when the going becomes tough.

Children are a blank slate when they are born. It is a scary thought, but in the early years, children may well become what adults tell them they are. The child who is told they are stupid and worthless will believe that is what they are. A child who is nurtured to believe in him or herself, encouraged to take risks and is continually reinforced for their efforts with positive affirmations and respect, will most likely develop a strong belief in him or herself and their capabilities.

And yes, as they grow, their peers and teachers will and do influence their sense of self, but we can only hope the positive foundations we have nurtured are solidly in place. Here are 10 tips to empower kids so they can develop into confident, happy, respectful, well-adjusted and resilient teenagers and adults.

1. Give your child choice.

From a young age, encourage your child to make decisions that directly relate to them. For example, allow your child to choose between cereal or toast for breakfast; the red, pink, blue or green toothbrush; the orange T-shirt or the striped T-shirt. Choosing their own outfits is always interesting! Choice and voice go together. Allowing your child choice gives them a voice in what directly relates to them and their daily life.

2. Listen to your child.

Not only listen to your child’s voice but note their moods and listen for what is NOT being said. When you ask your child how they are after school, REALLY ask them how they are. Stop what your are doing and engage. Find out what may be upsetting them or what may be giving them joy. Ensure nothing is off the table and ensure your child can tell you or ask you about anything. And if you child doesn’t like someone or doesn’t wish to go with a certain person, listen. I don’t wish to scare you unnecessarily, but this is one of the signs a child may indirectly provide if they are being sexually abused.

3. Teach your child Body Safety.

There is nothing more empowering than teaching your child age-appropriate Body Safety Education. Providing children with knowledge about their personal boundaries and their rights is incredibly empowering. A child educated in Body Safety knows to tell if they are touched inappropriately, and they are far less likely to become a victim of a sexual abuse.

4. Allow your child to take risks.

Trust your child to explore their environment and this means taking risks. If possible, try to stop yourself reaching out. Trust your child to climb that tree, go down that big slide and swim a lap alone. Risking on purpose is important for your child to develop self-confidence. Hold yourself back, not your child, and allow them to explore their world.

5. Use your words wisely.

Encourage your child’s endeavors with words such as smart, amazing, strong, creative, talented, etc. Particularly with daughters — try not to focus on their physical appearance and focus on their talents and creative pursuits. When in “discussions” with older kids, remember what has been said can’t be unsaid. As you child drifts off to sleep, whisper something positive about the day’s activities that relates directly to them. Going to sleep feeling positive, loved and safe is empowering!

6. Encourage your child to follow their interests.

Your child’s interests may not always be your interests but if your child loves to dance or play football than be as supportive and encouraging as you can. I know! This should go without saying!

7. Allow your child to greet others in a way they are comfortable with.

When greeting relatives or friends allow your child to greet others with a high five or a hand-shake if they don’t wish to be hugged or kissed. Just because your child is a child doesn’t mean they should be forced to show affection. This only gives them the message that their wishes don’t matter. Your child should give hugs and kisses willingly, and all adults and other children need to respect this.

8. Discourage gender stereotyping.

Encourage your child to believe he or she can strive to be or do anything they set their heart toward. Discourage gender stereotyping and do not become a party to the media’s continual bombardment. Once you see gender stereotyping in our interactions with others you can’t un-see it. Respect all genders, see only equality and model this to your kids.

9. Encourage perseverance, resilience and integrity

Life is not always easy, so encourage your child to try and keep on trying until they succeed or come close to it! I must admit I am a bit of a trier and it has held me in good stead. Encourage and model perseverance, resilience and integrity through daily activities and conversations.

10. Teach your child the “pirate stance”!

This a fun activity but actually an empowering one! Have your child stand for 30 seconds like a pirate a couple of times a week. Have them place their hands on their hips, their legs slightly apart and their shoulders back. Research tells us this stance is incredibly empowering; particularly for girls. Give it a try yourself!

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Kilauea volcano and Hawaii Geography

A county official urged visitors not to be deterred by dramatic images of the eruption of Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano, as only a small part of the state is affected.  Kilauea volcano has gobbled up lush landscape, destroyed houses and caused nearly 2,000 people to flee their homes. It's also wreaking havoc on Hawaii's famed  tourism industry  to an estimated tune of millions of dollars in the first week after the May 3 eruption.  At a Monday night briefing, Hawaii County Managing Director Wil Okabe called on reporters to help minimize the economic fallout by getting their geography straight when they describe the affected and putting it in the proper context.  For one, the impacted area is on the Island of Hawaii, also known as the Big Island, also known as Hawaii -- so  named  for being the largest island in the state.  It's nearly twice as big as all the other Hawaiian islands combined and offers a range of climate zones from wet tropical to polar tundra, hence its massive tourist appeal.  The area affected by ongoing seismic activity, summit deflation, and a possible steam explosion at the summit of Kīlauea is the eastern part of the state near Leilani Estates, an area that contains less than 5% of the island's population, Okabe said. It contains Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, two-thirds of which remain closed.  "All of you here in the media today needs to send a message that Hawaii County, Hawaii Island is safe. The rest of the state is safe," Okabe said.      Hawaii's tourism industry gets walloped by relentless volcano    Tourism in Kona on the other side of the Big Island was suffering from the negative publicity, Okabe said. He likened the economic impact to a catastrophe in Disneyland causing visitors to cancel reservations in Colorado. He urged people to not rely solely on social media to obtain updates about conditions on the ground and to seek information from official government sources.  "Social media, it has its place but in this particular situation we do not want to create any panic to any of our constituents or the people of this island," he said. "We don't want to give wrong messages not only to our island but to the rest of this country."

A county official urged visitors not to be deterred by dramatic images of the eruption of Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano, as only a small part of the state is affected.

Kilauea volcano has gobbled up lush landscape, destroyed houses and caused nearly 2,000 people to flee their homes. It's also wreaking havoc on Hawaii's famed tourism industry to an estimated tune of millions of dollars in the first week after the May 3 eruption.

At a Monday night briefing, Hawaii County Managing Director Wil Okabe called on reporters to help minimize the economic fallout by getting their geography straight when they describe the affected and putting it in the proper context.

For one, the impacted area is on the Island of Hawaii, also known as the Big Island, also known as Hawaii -- so named for being the largest island in the state.

It's nearly twice as big as all the other Hawaiian islands combined and offers a range of climate zones from wet tropical to polar tundra, hence its massive tourist appeal.

The area affected by ongoing seismic activity, summit deflation, and a possible steam explosion at the summit of Kīlauea is the eastern part of the state near Leilani Estates, an area that contains less than 5% of the island's population, Okabe said. It contains Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, two-thirds of which remain closed.

"All of you here in the media today needs to send a message that Hawaii County, Hawaii Island is safe. The rest of the state is safe," Okabe said.

 

Hawaii's tourism industry gets walloped by relentless volcano

Tourism in Kona on the other side of the Big Island was suffering from the negative publicity, Okabe said. He likened the economic impact to a catastrophe in Disneyland causing visitors to cancel reservations in Colorado. He urged people to not rely solely on social media to obtain updates about conditions on the ground and to seek information from official government sources.

"Social media, it has its place but in this particular situation we do not want to create any panic to any of our constituents or the people of this island," he said. "We don't want to give wrong messages not only to our island but to the rest of this country."

More tips do for taking children to a Maui beach – Children, Tweenies & Teens

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For children older than 1, take your cue from kids who live in Hawaii and spend a lot of time at the beach: swim shirts (rash guards) are a must! These nylon/spandex shirts and bodysuits are the best way to protect sensitive skin.

Consider applying a complete sunblock, such as zinc, to a child’s nose, under the eyes, on the back of the neck, and on the tops of the ears. (This is in addition to the waterproof SPF 30 sunscreen they should already be wearing.)

Do Sunscreen Right
Get to know the American Academy of Pediatrics' guidelines on sunscreen use, which include wearing hats, sunglasses, and cover-ups, minimizing sun exposure between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m., and pausing every two hours, or after swimming or sweating, to reapply sunscreen of SPF 15 or greater that protects against both UVA and UVB rays. (NOTE: Hawaii may soon  ban the sale and distribution of any sunscreens containing oxybenzone and octinoxate, which scientists say damage reefs. Here are some other options - https://www.mauireefs.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/MNMRC-Be-Sunscreen-Smart.pdf )

Choose to set up near the Lifeguard stand

Ask about wave conditions – rip currents and shore breaks

Arrive Early – the beach is more pleasant before the wind picks up

Older kids also run the risk of dehydration. Make sure they drink LOTS of water or non-caffeinated juice throughout the day. Avoid soda.

No diving until you know the depth even if you see others diving there

Even if your child can swim, always keep close eye on them in the water

Look but don’t touch marine life

Take frequent breaks - Exhaustion, sunburn, hypothermia, heat stroke and more are all common problems when spending time at the beach by the water all day long. Set your watch and take a short break every hour.

Take care of yourself so you can take care of your children

Be Smart About How You Leave and allow for smooth transition.

Some tips for taking children to a Maui beach - Infants & Toddlers

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Consider leaving your infant (six months or younger) with a daycare provider if you plan to be at the beach for more than an hour during peak exposure times. It is difficult to keep very young children from getting sunburned or overheated.

If you do bring an infant to the beach for a brief stay, take care to cover the child with lightweight, breathable clothing (including a hat). Sunscreen is not recommended for children under six months old.

If you opt to protect your infant from the sun with a beach umbrella or covered safety seat, clothe the baby in a diaper only. Anything heavier may overheat and dehydrate the child.

Pack your child’s clothes in gallon size plastic bags.

Schedule downtime. YOU and your toddler will NEED it! 

Baby Wipes are your enemy while Baby Powder is your friend at the beach! Baby wipes do nothing other than collect sand at the beach!  The baby powder works wonders for getting the sand off. Use Baby Powder to De-Sand Baby

Don’t force your toddler toward the ocean

Relax, Have Fun, and Let Your Toddler Lead the Way

 

 

 

Parenting the Art of Dreaming Big

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1. Role Model: As a parent, live your dreams. Children pay great attention to what you do. They are more prone to do what you do than do what you say, so be passionate about your life, your purpose and talk to your children about it daily. Let them see and know the value of your hard work. Live a purpose driven life.

2. Create a Vision: Talk to your children about what they want to be when they grow up and allow them to be as creative as possible. Once the mind and emotions generate a vision, the behavior naturally follows. Emotions are E-Motion, or energy in motion. Teach them to create a vision and to love it with all their heart. This will put the right energies in motion to get them towards that vision.

3. Positive Self Talk: Teach the power of belief. Self-defeating thoughts need to be replaced by positive, forward-moving, power thoughts starting with “I am.” “I am successful,” “I am worthy of my dreams,” “I am capable.” In this way, we teach our children that negative thoughts are low-level and positive thoughts are high-level and propel them into forward-moving, positive-motion towards what they want to achieve.

4. Encourage the Impossible: Teach there is not a dream so big it cannot be achieved. Encourage your children to take risks no matter how big or impossible the dream may look to them. This covertly communicates to them that YOU believe they can do it which helps them to believe they can do it. If your belief in them is a given, then their belief in themselves will follow along.

5. Encourage Education: Achieving any dream takes hard work, commitment and education. Education opens doors of opportunity that will open their minds more creatively when striving towards a goal. The more information our children have the more imaginative they will be able envision themselves in a variety of different roles and settings which sets them on the path to unlimited achievement.

6. Failure as a Gift: Learning to cope with failure is at the core of being successful. When our children fail, we must encourage them to see the gift. Failure sets them more deliberately on their path because it is through failure they learn what will work towards achieving their goal and what will not. Failure, then, is positive and only improves their chances at getting to their dream.

7. Resilience: Not all dreams work out as planned, but we must parent them to get back up, dust themselves off, redirect, re-purpose and keep on going. Resilience is fundamental to success. It helps us to adapt and become independent and self-confident. We teach our children to believe that no one can step in the way of their greatness but them, and them doing that is not an option.

8. Grateful thinking: Teach them to see that every opportunity is a gift. It may not be the opportunity they want at that time, it may be smaller than they wanted but they will soon learn that it is through some of the smaller opportunities that the bigger one’s come.

Children are the leaders of the future tomorrows. Each day they step out the front door is a day for them to make a positive and meaningful difference. They have the capacity to leave the world a better place than when they first arrived. In order to get there, children deserve to be encouraged to reach for the stars, to fulfill their potential, and to live their best possible life.

Little life Message: As. U.S. author Henry David Thoreau said, “Go confidently in the direction of your dreams; live the life you have imagined.”

Follow Sherrie Campbell, PhD on Twitter:

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/sherrie-campbell-phd/8-steps-to-parenting-the-art-of-dreaming-big_b_5399796.html

Ocean Safety in Hawaii Part 2

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  • Look for, read, and obey all beach and safety signs
  • Always best to swim in life guarded areas
  • Ask a lifeguard about beach and surf safety before swimming
  • Avoid swimming offshore during dusk, dawn and overnight hours, when sharks are most active.
  • If you are unable to swim out of a strong current, signal for help
  • Do not attempt to dive or jump over large waves
  • Protect the environment. Refrain from touching all reefs or marine animals. Help keep the beaches clean and Hawaii beautiful
  • http://www.co.maui.hi.us/DocumentCenter/View/97704 (county of Maui Ocean Safety Guide with a lot of useful tips)

Ocean Safety in Hawaii Part 1

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In the Water

 If in doubt, don't go out!

  • Never turn your back on the ocean! face toward the ocean and keep a keen eye out for large waves. If you do encounter a large wave, dive under the wave as it moves over you.
  • ALWAYS watch your children closely in the ocean. Do not leave older children to be in charge of younger ones.
  • Understand that waves come in sets and can change radically very quick
  • Use inflatables, floater, life jackets, on your child
  • Respect the power of the shore breaks in Hawaii.
  • Never swim alone

Picking the right Maui beach for children

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Note: A recent man’s death marks the 16th water related fatality this year on Maui.

 

Maui has many beautiful beaches but be very careful in deciding which beach to select to bring your child. There has been a number of injuries and deaths of visitors who over estimated their abilities and/or underestimated the power of the ocean. I swim over a mile every other day in a 50 meter pool on Maui but am very cautious about swimming in the ocean here. Take the time to do the research, ask questions, especially of locals and always keep an eye of your child in the water. Some of the more dangerous places to swim where a number of accidents have taken place include

1.      Big Beach in Makena

2.      Black Rock in Kaanapali

3.      Hookipa in Paia

4.      Koki and Hamoa in Hana

Better choices of fun & safe beaches to bring children include

1.      Baby Beach in Lahaina Town (Google 51 Puunoa Place)

2.      Baby Beach (North Shore) It can get windy in the afternoon

3.      Kuau Cove (North Shore) In front of Mama's Fish House

4.      Kamaole Beaches (Kihei) Kam 1 has swings and volleyball net

5.      Napili Bay - Nice beach but few amenities- no lifeguards, little parking,)

6.      Launiupoko Beach - fishing, surfing, swimming and baby wading

Just because you see people in the ocean, does not mean you or your child can handle the conditions. You are not in Kansas anymore.

For information on these and other child & family friendly beaches on Maui, contact contact me at Darby@mauidreamday.com

Remember, If in doubt, don't go out!

 

Rainy day options on Maui (or what to do with children when you want a break from the beach)

It’s been raining a lot lately on Maui so here are some of the options when you get rained out or have some time to kill or just want to get a break from the beach

Here are some Child Friendly options for you (alphabetically listed):

·         Banyan Tree Park

·         Cruising Upcountry

·         Fun Factory

·         Hyatt Regency Wildlife Tour

·         Iao Valley

·         Kealia Wildlife Boardwalk

·         Keiki Playhouse

·         Lahaina Animal Farm

·         Malls

§  Queen Kaahumanu Center

§  Maui Mall

§  Lahaina Cannery Mall

·         Maui Golf & Sports Park

·         Maui Ocean Center

·         Maui Tropical Plantation

A longer version of this information is available on request. If you have any questions or need more information or options, contact me anytime at Darby@mauidreamday.com

Building sand creations with your child - Part 3

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Age Appropriate Tips for Building Sand Castles and Sculptures

The following tips are great for kids that are 3 to 4 years old:

  • Provide plenty of help and supervision.
  • Keep structures simple, such as a fish or turtle.
  • Use very wet sand, re-wetting it with the spray bottle as needed.

Tips for kids that are 5 to 8 years old:

  • Add some details.
  • Suggest they use small toys or figurines or shells and stones to create more interesting features.
  • Take a picture or make a video of their creation to document its progress.

Tips for kids that are 9 to 12 years old:

  • Encourage them to build taller, bigger castles and sculptures.
  • Encourage them to use the Internet to find pictures of what they want to build.

Building sand creations with your child - Part 2

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Tips for Building Sand Castles and Sculptures

The following tips will give you a good start but remember that practice is important and starting out with simple designs is best if your kids are very young and/or this is your first attempt at building since your own childhood. Before starting decide as a group what structure you want to build. Once you have agreed what to sculpt or build you need to keep the following basics in mind:

  • Location: Choose one that's three or four feet back from the previous night's peek for the tide line. You can usually tell the tide line by looking for a line of debris such as ocean plant residue or a shelf of sand that was carved by the water.
  • Use Plenty of Water: Follow the rule, "Add sand to water, not water to sand." A great foundation starts with plenty of water, so have the kids start hauling buckets of water and have them pour it onto the dry sand that you want to build on. Assign one person to start piling the wet sand up and begin packing it as high and wet as possible. Once the pile is the desired height (usually two to four feet) start pouring a 50/50 mixture of sand and water from each pail. If blended properly, it will pour like mud and start to firm up within a few seconds. You are now ready to mold the structure into the basic shape you've decided to create.
  • Carve from the top down. Visualize your desired creation as you start to carve and remove anything that's not in your design plan. You can create bricks or stones by cutting lines then blowing out the loose sand with a straw (make sure your eyes are covered to prevent getting sand in them).
  • Preserve your creation for a while longer by spraying bottled water over the entire castle or sculpture.

 

Building sand creations with your child - Part 1

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Reasons to Build Sand Castles With Your Kids

In addition to the main reason which is to have fun at the beach, building sand castles and sculptures together will:

  • Teach kids about team work and cooperation
  • Help stimulate their imaginations
  • Provide plenty of exercise
  • Teach them patience
  • Promote a feeling of accomplishment
  • Improve your child's self-esteem
  • May help your child make a new friend or friends at the beach
  • Teach your child a new skill
  • Give your child something to write or talk about when he/she goes back to school

Sand Sculpting Tools

There's no need to spend money on fancy sand sculpting tool kits, although most beach resorts will be happy to sell them to you. Great creations can be built with the following basics:

  • Plastic shovels
  • Various sized buckets and pails, cups and bowls
  • Tools for carving such as plastic knives, forks, spoons and spatulas
  • Pieces of string for shaving and shaping
  • Straws
  • A large plastic spray bottle filled with water (this should not be salt water as salt will clog the nozzle)